Listening and Responding to Children

Throughout April we’ve addressed the importance of understanding the Y’s abuse prevention policies, recognizing red flags and boundary violations and how to talk with your children about abuse. Now, it’s important that all parents and caregivers know how to respond to boundary violations and warning signs if children tell you about abuse. At the Y, we are mandated reporters, so we have procedures in place for responding and reporting suspected abuse.

As a parent, you can follow these 5 steps:

  • Keep your eyes & ears open
  • Talk with your child
  • Ask your child about any concerns you have.
  • If what you learn from your child or what you have observed/overheard sounds like abuse, call Child Protective Services or the police.
  • If what you’ve heard or observed sounds like a boundary violation, suspicious or inappropriate behavior, or a policy violation:
    • Share your concerns with the employee/supervisor/person in charge of the organization.
    • If you are unable to do this, make a report to the organization by making a call, sending an email, or submitting an online form.

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