KNOW. SEE. RESPOND.

By understanding the three habits of child sexual abuse prevention – KNOW. SEE. RESPOND – we can create a safer world for children.

KNOWing the facts about child sexual abuse can help you better understand what to look for and how to prevent abuse.

Offenders often attempt to press boundaries and break rules. When we SEE boundaries being crossed, rules being violated, or see signs a child is being sexually abused, we must be prepared to intervene on a child’s behalf.

If you suspect abuse, how do you RESPOND? When it comes to reporting abuse, it can be intimidating, but it does not have to be! If you are prepared, you will know exactly when and how to report. In our counties, you should report abuse to the South Carolina Department of Social Services at 1-888-CARE4US (1-888-227-3487). Learn more about reporting abuse at www.fivedaysofaction.org.

Check out the KNOW. SEE. RESPOND. booklet for tips on the three habits, including questions to ask the organizations serving your children about their child protection policy and hiring practices.

You can access our prevention policy at this link. These policies are reviewed yearly and follow or exceed all best practices.

Together, we foster a culture of child abuse prevention. Find prevention tips and resources by checking out www.fivedaysofaction.org.

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